better late than never: the 2012 sew weekly “pantone” challenge

so we started here back in march:

and immediately i knew i had some fabric that played with “starfish”, “driftwood”, and “tangerine tango,” the 2012 color of the year.

yes, that is my liberty of london obsession, “minako,” in lantana wool.

and i knew i wanted to play with a really cool 1930s wrap-around skirt pattern i had scored.

i even had weekend sewing progress two weeks in a row.


but no finished product.
until now.

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ta daaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa!

yes, i finally finished it, the weekend before christmas.  i finally had the right combination of buttons, trim, petersham ribbon and patience.  i also finished up this great art deco-inspired blouse from simplicity 2723, another 1930s gem.

i actually would like to make a little tie for the blouse out of some leftover lantana.

i feel like in the 1930s and 1940s simplicity really and truly lived up to its name.  the fashions are very much of the day and relatively easy to construct, provided you don’t actually need the pattern instructions, which are a bit skimpy.  the blouse went together in a mere two hours, and languished only because i wasn’t willing to sacrifice the time for a trip to jonathan embroidery for the buttonholes.  (#firstworldsewingproblems, right there)  unfortunately, the white cotton voile, although completely dreamy, does not photograph well, so you will have to take my word for it that the seams are as awesome as the pattern illustration suggests.  i nipped up the back using a trick kenneth king taught me to create a built-in swayback adjustment, and i got a nearly perfect fit.

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i know it is just a simple wrap skirt and really, i almost didn’t even need a pattern (i wanted one for the 1930s fun of it), but it is so cute and comfortable to wear.  even more so than what i had originally hoped when i began the project.  the skirt has just the right amount of fun and kitsch, and paired with the simple top and leather blazer makes a great work combo for days when i don’t have any grown-up meetings.

should i be lucky enough to score another piece of liberty lantana wool, i would love to do the version with the pleats for that extra 1930s vibe.

a few construction details, to justify the post:  i did finish the blouse entirely in french seams, including on the armscyes.  i topstitched the front panels to give them a bit of extra detail, and created a sort of shirt placket facing by using a piece of silk organza selvedge similar to the way suggested by the “clean facing” technique on off the cuff.  i used heart-shaped buttons on everything, just because, and finished the skirt in a just-barely-long enough piece of trip leftover from my “parisienne” dress.

US friends, did you enjoy the three-day weekend?  my usual holiday weekend “sweatshop” turned into a holiday weekend workshop, and my arms and my knees are really, really angry with me.  stripping wallpaper is hard!!

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…but let me tell you, primer white has never looked so beautiful as it does after 8 hours of trying to shred 25-year-old paper off of a closet wall.

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9 Responses to better late than never: the 2012 sew weekly “pantone” challenge

  1. gingermakes says:

    Yikes, stripping wallpaper is SO not fun! Sadly, my three-day weekend was actually a two-day weekend… my work is mean. But on happier topics, your outfit is super cute!

  2. Jenny says:

    Cute! I like how you styled the whole outfit!

  3. SailAway says:

    1) fun fabric and I “<3" heart buttons.
    2) There was a weekend? And it had three days? Wow, luxurious sounding. That must be pleasant.

  4. Clio says:

    My evil foreign overlord – I mean my “employer” – did not give us the day off. Sigh.

    I think when you’ve got such an abundance of hearts on the fabric, the ONLY way to go is to add more hearts for buttons! And lace too! More is more! Yay for more. LOL

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